Category Archives: New York

olde name

“Thank you again for coming in on your day off, Hoss, to help me.”

“Well,” he answers. “Sounds like the fate of the whole town depends on us finding some facts!”

“So right,” Teebestia replies. “According to this ‘Big Book of Moths and Butterflies’, the name Astarte comes from a particular moth, just like Lapara and almost all sims of the continent we’ve checked. Not a local demon. How ’bout you? Found anything?”

“Still looking through this old book on Malone, the one that told us its most famous resident was Wheeler.”

“Which is impossible. She just showed up there! Still, we should interview her.”

“Hold on, Teeb… here’s a section on Owls Head.” He turns the page, reads a bit further, then utters: “Oh me Godz.”

“What is it?”

Owls Head use to be called Ringville!

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Filed under *Second Life, Heterocera, Lapara, New York, Uncategorized

Ashokan, Little Tonshi

“Where *am* I??”

—–

“There, that’s better. Hi Rocky!”

“We found an Ickle,” the raccoon mumbles, half asleep.

“What’s that Rocky?”

His eyes open. “Two of them, Bettie. A blue one, then a green one. East and west. Directly.” He turns into the walking version of himself and goes to her. “Down there. Just in the other sim.”

“What are we waiting for?” she asks rhetorically.

—–

“What now?”

“We wait,” states the raccoon.

“Oh my.”

“Rocky?”

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Filed under *Second Life, Heterocera, Lapara, New York, UmapS, Uncategorized

Marbles 02

TEXT SOON.
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Presley

Presley was born on January 8, 1935, in Tupelo, Mississippi, the son of Gladys Love (née Smith; April 25, 1912 – August 14, 1958) and Vernon Elvis Presley (April 10, 1916 – June 26, 1979),[12] in the two-room shotgun house built by Vernon’s father in preparation for the child’s birth. Jesse Garon Presley, his identical twin brother, was delivered stillborn 35 minutes before him.[13] As an only child, Presley became close to both parents and formed an especially close bond with his mother. The family attended an Assembly of God church, where he found his initial musical inspiration.[14]

“There can be….

… little doubt

MORE TEXT SOON.

coalcounty

https://bakerbloch.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/owl-centrahoma/

Jesse_Pinkman2
Better call Saul!

Special:

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*Jack’s son* (Daniel, or Danny) is special.
Shines. Like moonshine.

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Filed under Illinois, New York, Oklahoma, Toy Avatars, UmapS, West Virginia

and/or

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http://www.bakercsd.com/linked/how%20did%20baker.pdf

Baker has appeared before here:

https://bakerbloch.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/up-with-maps-01/

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And “Caledonia” also appears in a second F&H,E! post.

https://bakerbloch.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/murdochs-islands/

Cherry Island (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Muireach, meaning Murdoch’s Island) is the only island in Loch Ness, Highland, Scotland, and is an example of a crannog.[1] The island is about 150 yards (140 m) from the shore near the southern end of the loch. The island was originally 160 feet (49 m) by 168 feet (51 m) across, but is now smaller as the level of the loch was raised when it became part of the Caledonian Canal.[1] The increase in the level of the loch caused a smaller natural island nearby Eilean Nan Con[2] (also known in its Anglicised form of “Dog Island”), to be totally submerged.

“Caledonia” submerges Dog I. and makes Cherry Island or “Murdoch’s Island” smaller. But Cherry Island is artificial in nature and wouldn’t be there atall without man. Smaller Eilean Nan Con or Dog I. is natural in contrast.

The name Baker is similarly submerged beneath Martel in Ohio near Caledonia (latter with Harding-Anderson overlap from past), but a twinned Baker, as it is, remains next to Caledonia in New York state. Not submerged or lost in the seas of history.

Caledonia (OH plus NY) represents the levels of Lock Ness and its Cherry and Dog isles. It follows that Baker equals past Lock Ness, pre-Caledonian Canal connected, with its Cherry Island and Dog Island both intact. Martel represents the present Caledonia Canal situation for the lock, with Cherry Island made smaller (now 51m x 49m) and Dog Island having completely disappeared.

(continued in: we know more)

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Filed under California, Middletown, New York, Ohio, UmapS, United Kingdom

up with maps! 01

Baker (excerpt):

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledonia,_New_York

Communities and locations in the Town of Caledonia

Baker – A hamlet in the northeast part of the town.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledonia,_Ohio

Notable natives

Warren G. Harding was a resident of Caledonia during his childhood, and worked for a brief period of time at the community newspaper, The Argus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_G._Harding

Upon graduating, Harding had stints as a teacher and insurance man, and made a brief attempt at studying law. He then raised $300 in partnership with others to purchase the failing Marion Daily Star, the weakest of the growing city’s three newspapers. By 1886, he completely owned the Star.[14][16]

….When Harding moved to unseat the Marion Independent as the official daily paper, he met with strong resistance from local figures, such as Amos Hall Kling, one of Marion’s wealthiest real estate speculators. The editorial battle with the Independent became so heated that, at the inevitable mention of Harding’s questionable bloodline, father and son brought a shotgun and demanded a retraction at gunpoint. They were successful.[18]
Florence Harding

While Harding won the war of words and made the Marion Daily Star one of the most popular newspapers in the county, the battle took a toll on his health. In 1889, at age 24, he suffered from exhaustion and nervous fatigue. He spent several weeks at the Battle Creek Sanitarium to regain his strength and ultimately made 5 visits over 14 years.[19] Harding later returned to Marion to continue operating the paper.

…. In the last year of his Presidency, anticipating no resumption of his journalism career following his years in the White House, Harding sold the Star to Louis H. Brush and Roy D. Moore for $550,000.[25]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherwood_Anderson#Early_life

The Andersons headed north to Caledonia by way of a brief stay in a village of a few hundred called Independence (now Butler). Four[7] or five[8] years were spent in Caledonia, years which formed Anderson’s earliest memories. This period later inspired his semi-autobiographical novel Tar: A Midwest Childhood (1926).[9] In Caledonia Anderson’s father began drinking excessively, which led to financial difficulties, eventually causing the family to leave the town.[9]

7. Townsend (1987), 3
8. Rideout (2006), 18
9. Rideout (2006), 20. For connection between Tar and Caledonia, also see Anderson (1942), 14-16

The success of Dark Laughter put some extra money in Anderson’s pocket, and he used it in 1926 to purchase Ripshin, a small farm outside Marion in southwestern Virginia. Soon after, he also bought two newspapers, the Smyth County News and the Marion Democrat. As a newspaperman, Anderson immersed himself in local politics and even sometimes adopted an alter ego and pseudonym, Buck Fever, to report on colorful characters and events in town. (He collected some of his Buck Fever columns in 1929’s Hello Towns!) Anderson gave ownership of the newspapers to his son Robert in 1929….

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Anderson moved from Caledonia to Clyde in 1884.

http://www.cleveland.com/pdq/index.ssf/2012/11/90-second-know-it-all_8_us_pre.html

Taft and Harding are the last 2 (of 8) presidents born in Ohio. 2 of these 8 were assassinated (4, Garfield, and 6, McKinley). Both Taft and Harding only served 1 term. Taft was considered a “standard” president, while Harding is considered one of the worst, and could have been the first to be impeached had he not died in office. William Henry Harrison, the first Ohioan president, also died in office, the first president to do so.

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Filed under New York, Ohio, Virginia

40/90

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owl-s-head

http://www.color-hex.com/color/444444

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelphia,_New_Jersey

Prior to the community adapting its name from the Greek word for ‘brotherhood’ (adelphia), the area was previously known as Turkey. The only remnants of Turkey happen to lie within the title of a nearby county park, Turkey Swamp Park.

Philadelphia Freedom

Only Yellow Br/ pp…

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At the conclusion of The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy flies away from Emerald City at the end of the yellow brick road to return to her Kansas farm.

“We are moving back in time from North (City) to South (Farm), and all the urban vs rural underlying causes of the Civil War.”

bb:

Rural (Rural Hall, etc.) then dealt with in NC through Mayberry, etc. Lack of African-Americans in Andy Griffith Show.

Hucka D.:

We will have more Elton symbols in Miss. later on [and his first US no. 1]: Crocodile Rock<Eagle Rock.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodile_Rock

The song was inspired by John’s discovery of leading Australian band Daddy Cool and their hit single “Eagle Rock”, which was the most successful Australian single of the early 1970s (with 1,000,000 sold),[4] remaining at No.1 for a record of 10 weeks.[5][6] John heard the song and the group on his 1972 Australian tour and was greatly impressed by it.[4] A photo included in the album packaging features John’s lyricist, Bernie Taupin, wearing a “Daddy Who?” promotional badge. The song also appears to have been strongly influenced by songs from the late 50s-early 60s (“when Rock was young”), including Del Shannon’s 1962 “Cry Myself to Sleep”, and “Little Darlin'” (recorded in 1957 by The Diamonds and The Gladiolas). The chorus resembles “Speedy Gonzales” by Pat Boone. While there was no actual “Crocodile Rock”, there was a dance called The Alligator.

bb:

Elton “steps up” from Matland and its Crocodile Rock to enter 4 Sticks territory. The year is ’73. Yellow Brick Road territory again. Is he coming or going? Welcome Mat.

carroll3b

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Day-Lewis

Rather bizarre framing of Daniel and Day in Carroll County MD by Barrett (east) and Watersville (west). Roger Pine Ridge anyone? Winfield is a codeword [for the magic book]. Mt. Airy and Taylorsville nearby (Andy Taylor of Mayberry, based on Mt. Airy).

I also can’t help but think there’s a relationship between the oddly named location “Plane No. 4” on the Carroll County map above (to left of Mt. Airy) and this…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Airlines_Flight_93

… but I haven’t figured out how yet.

Of the four aircraft hijacked on September 11 – the others were American Airlines Flight 11, American Airlines Flight 77 and United Airlines Flight 175 – United Airlines Flight 93 was the only one that did not reach its hijackers’ intended target.

Lineboro *and* Roller in ne corner of Carroll County have already come up here.

https://bakerbloch.wordpress.com/2014/04/03/we-have-03/

Bizarre! I now recall, in looking up “Winesap” related posts on this blog, that Carroll County and its Winfield have already arisen here.

https://bakerbloch.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/carrcass-11/

Now it links to Winfield, Kansas!

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November 13, 2014 · 4:02 am

Pancake, etc.

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Laboratory, Penn., an unusual name in itself and now connected to the “Beaman’s Laboratory” in Falmouth’s “Beamen” college, has an unusual variant name in Pancake. To remind, this Laboratory (there’s 1 other pp in US with this name, near Lincolnton, NC) was uncovered due to another listed variant name of Marlinsburg.

Of the 3 other US Pancakes, one exists in Centre County, Penn., a place name also mentioned recently (LINK).

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Cavett

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/From_the_Ashes:_The_Life_and_Times_of_Tick_Hall

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Very cool Cavett-Tick Hall synchronicity…

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/11/strange-dear-but-true-dear/comment-page-8/?_r=0

I quote in full:

Strange, Dear, but True, Dear
By Dick Cavett
September 11, 2009 9:30 pmSeptember 11, 2009 9:30 pm

We were living in an ice-house that winter.

(That sentence is not about a power failure, but is the result of my favorite high school English teacher in Nebraska, Esther Montgomery, who advocated trying for an arresting opening sentence in writing a story. I hope you are arrested.)

I could as easily have begun with, “It was an ice-house; and it had been inhabited by Franklin D. Roosevelt.”

Clarification: My wife and I had been offered a place to go on winter weekends to recover from the weekly grind of taping five 90-minute shows in four days on ABC. It was, in fact, a former ice-house on the property of a majestic old manse in, I think it was, Stockbridge, N.Y. Its walls were at least a solid foot thick and it belonged to the eminent Canadian actor Donald Davis, abroad for the winter. He had fixed it up into a cozy dwelling, surrounded by woods. Memories of older neighbors confirmed F.D.R.’s having used it as a sometime retreat for himself and a lady friend. (Unfortunately, the walls could not talk.)

You are about to have your credulity strained, on a topic in line with an earlier column. One that caused readers to send their own similarly bizarre incidents.

It was a bright winter Saturday morning and I’d gone into the small town to get the paper. Not having done this before, I realized in returning that I hadn’t paid attention and was not sure how to get back. I was lost. All streets looked equally likely, so I picked one of many for no reason.

I picked wrong, but that led to what followed.

In front of a schoolhouse there were a lot of parked cars and people milling around among tables, apparently shopping for whatever was on display. Seeing the words “Village Book Fair” made me want to stop, but for some forgotten reason, I was in a hurry. It was clearly a popular event but, sadly, there were no vacant parking spaces for even a quick inspection, so I chose, reluctantly, to move on. But suddenly a car obligingly pulled out right in front of me, and I pulled in.

Twenty or so card tables held a sea of books. Still in a hurry, I decided to check only the nearest table that chance and the exiting car had placed before me. Without looking at any titles, I picked up a clearly used volume, mainly to see the quality and condition of the books offered. I didn’t even notice the title, but let it fall open somewhere near the middle and read a passage at random, the (approximate) following words: “Harrison was disappointed. Montauk would not show its face for the fog, and he so wanted me to love the adored place as much as he did.” The author went on to say that they spent the week-end, fog-bound, in the old house on the mist-shrouded cliffs.

Goose flesh.

A glance at the spine revealed the book to be an autobiography from the 1940s: “Who Tells Me True,” by Michael Strange. “Harrison” was Harrison Tweed, an eminent attorney at the historic and prestigious Wall Street firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy and (chance again) a friend of Roosevelt’s.

I like to think that one or two perhaps elderly and steeped-in-literary-knowledge readers among you would realize that the combination of “Michael” and “Harrison” does not indicate a gay partnership. “Michael Strange” was the nom de plume of Blanche Oelrichs (1890-1950) — poet, playwright, actress — a bohemian woman of letters of the 1920s and ’30s who was married to John Barrymore for a time, and to Harrison Tweed for another. The daring lady had been known to startle the few neighbors in the remote area by the unheard of practice of going topless on the Montauk cliffs.

The McKim, Mead, and White historic house referred to in Ms. Strange’s book had been nicknamed “Tick Hall” by Tweed and his law-colleague fishing buddies — owing to the unwelcome presence, even back then, of the pestiferous local arachnid later notorious for spreading Lyme disease. The surf-casting weekend occupants of the house referred to one another as “Tick Tweed” and “Tick Morgan” and, quite likely, “Tick Roosevelt.”

Not an incredibly remarkable story so far, I admit.

Why the goose flesh? I had purchased that house from 91-year-old Harrison Tweed. Three days earlier.

Being a victim of innumeracy, I don’t know how you would calculate the odds against such a happening. In such instances, is there maybe something operating other than sheer chance? Does anyone know a good book on the subject?

A skeptic might begin attacking the almost supernatural quality of the thing with the picking up of the book. Even though in hoisting it I didn’t consciously look at the title, maybe in my deep unconscious I had somehow registered the title years before?

But did the same force make me open it to the only page that concerned me? Adding to this the randomly chosen street, the unexpected book fair, the unexpected parking place, the one table among the many — and I suppose you could add the double Roosevelt connection (ice-house/Tweed friendship) . . . putting all that together, you get odds comparable, I should think, to those against people foolish enough to dispose of needed dollars in the lottery. (I like the idea that only in a society “illiterate” about numbers could the lottery exist at all.)

What the hell is coincidence anyway, in its most astonishing instances? A subject worth pursuing at another time? Thinking about it fogs my mind, and makes me recall something that’s haunted me for years. It’s a koan-like thought from my class with the reincarnated Socrates of Yale, philosophy professor Paul Weiss: the idea that that, logically, there is no such thing as a possibility that did not take place. In what sense, then, was it possible?

And what, then, do you call things like my Tweed house incident. A possibility that was not caused?

Keep your answer brief, but pithy.

P.S. No more Burton teasing. Next time, including a hilarious story.

P.P.S. Could I buy someone in Philadelphia a season ticket to boo Michael Vick for me?

Close proximity of Tick Hall (Montauk, NY), Old Lyme, and Bloch Island, all mentioned in this blog now.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Lyme,_Connecticut

The placename “Lyme” derives from Lyme Regis, a small port on the coast of Dorset, England, from which it is believed the early settlers migrated in the 17th century.[3] The picturesque Old Lyme Cemetery contains the graves of the original settlers. The Duck River flows through the cemetery and into the Connecticut River at Watch Rock Park.

The “Lyme” in Lyme disease was named after the town. It was discovered in 1975 after a mysterious outbreak of what appeared to be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in children who lived in Lyme and Old Lyme.

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Filed under Connecticut, New York, Rhode Island, Texas, UmapS, Uncategorized