Daily Archives: November 23, 2014

up with maps! 03

03 counties named Marion with county seats also named Marion:

Marion County, Kansas
Marion County, Ohio
Marion County, South Carolina

We’ve spoken at length about Marion County, Ohio now and its Marion seat in the post before this one, concerning Warren G. Harding (and his nemesis and his wife who happens to be the daughter of the nemesis) and also S. Anderson. Does Marion County, Kansas give us more insights? Does the same named county in South Carolina? Actually the SC county is implied in the KS county. Let’s take a peep.

300px-Stouffer's_Railroad_Map_of_Kansas_1915-1918_Marion_County

“We can’t let you do that.”

bb:

Why not?

Hucka D.:

Just because.

bb:

I’ve made some important strides in map research, Hucka D.

Hucka D.:

Yes.

bb:

What next?

Hucka D.:

Something else.

—–

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How about that, then? Teach/ comes up with only 1 hit in GNIRPS, and that’s right next to Willard (and Wallace and Tin City) in North Carolina, Hucka D. Hucka? Probably went back to bed (lucky him). I think it has to represent “Teacher”, or, more specific, Kate Swift. Willard heads into the Beach Grove to think about her. Rev. Hartman is also dwelling on her the same day, his Achilles heel. Heal.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_White_Stockings

Chicago White Stockings players:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Chicago_White_Stockings_players

Chicago White Sox players (White Sox were called White Stockings in their first several years of existence, or about 1901-1903):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Chicago_White_Sox_players

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_White_Sox

One of the American League’s eight charter franchises, the Chicago team was established as a major league baseball club in 1900. The club was originally called the Chicago White Stockings, after the nickname abandoned by the Cubs, and the name was soon shortened to Chicago White Sox, believed to have been because the paper would shorten it to Sox in the headlines. At this time, the team played their home games at South Side Park. In 1910, the team moved into historic Comiskey Park, which they would inhabit for more than eight decades.

Black Sox scandal involving White Stockings>White Sox players, apparently already coded into GNIRPS [Pennsylvania]:

The 1919 World Series, however, was marred by the Black Sox Scandal, in which several prominent members of the White Sox (including Cicotte and [Shoeless Joe] Jackson) were accused of conspiring with gamblers to lose games purposefully.

player/: 2 of 2 (and pertaining to baseball as well):

Upon the baseball field Joe Welling stood by first base, his whole body quivering with excitement. In spite of themselves all the players watched him closely. The opposing pitcher became confused.

“Now! Now! Now! Now!” shouted the excited man. “Watch me! Watch me! Watch my fingers! Watch my hands! Watch my feet! Watch my eyes! Let’s work together here! Watch me! In me you see all the movements of the game! Work with me! Work with me! Watch me! Watch me! Watch me!”

With runners of the Winesburg team on bases, Joe Welling became as one inspired. Before they knew what had come over them, the base runners were watching the man, edging off the bases, advancing, retreating, held as by an invisible cord. The players of the opposing team also watched Joe. They were fascinated. For a moment they watched and then, as though to break a spell that hung over them, they began hurling the ball wildly about, and amid a series of fierce animal-like cries from the coach, the runners of the Winesburg team scampered home.

Also this (concerning shoeless and stockings, and heels again):

shoel/: 1 of 1:

Elmer was putting new shoelaces in his shoes. They did not go in readily and he had to take the shoes off. With the shoes in his hand he sat looking at a large hole in the heel of one of his stockings.

heel: 3 of 3:

The piece of glass broken out at the corner of the window just nipped off the bare heel of the boy standing motionless and looking with rapt eyes into the face of the Christ.

Will Henderson, who had on a light overcoat and no overshoes, kicked the heel of his left foot with the toe of the right.

With the shoes in his hand he sat looking at a large hole in the heel of one of his stockings.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaRue,_Ohio

LaRue has the distinction of being the smallest town to ever have an NFL franchise. In the early 1920s LaRue was home to famous athlete Jim Thorpe, who coached and played for the Oorang Indians football team in 1922–1923.

Notable residents

Dr. Charles E. Sawyer – a homeopathic physician who is blamed for giving a false diagnosis of U.S. President Warren G. Harding that led to Harding’s premature death, practiced medicine in LaRue.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Thorpe

Until 2005, most of Thorpe’s biographers were unaware of his basketball career[46] until a ticket discovered in an old book that year documented his career in basketball. By 1926, he was the main feature of the “World Famous Indians” of LaRue which sponsored traveling football, baseball and basketball teams. “Jim Thorpe and His World-Famous Indians” barnstormed for at least two years (1927–28) in parts of New York and Pennsylvania as well as Marion, Ohio. Although pictures of Thorpe in his WFI basketball uniform were printed on postcards and published in newspapers, this period of his life was not well documented.

World_Famous_Indians_letterhead

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Filed under Kansas, MAPS, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina

up with maps! 02

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We also know that one of the other presidents from Ohio was so awful at his job that in a strong alternate reality he actually became the last president of the United States. Appropriate his name is *U.S.* Grant. Harding was merely a warm-down. As regular blog readers of mine know, then Rutherford B. Hayes assumed the title of the first president of the U.S. that was never president of the U.S — US. Firesign Theatre fans might think this honor went to Benjamin Franklin instead, but they would be wrong. What of the diminutive, corndog chomping altie named Hays or Hayes? Did he indicate the change by dropping the “e”? Why did he buy Mouse Island north of Sandusky Bay and leave a Big Chimney (folder) there for later generations to find? The red (and blue) book is indicated within, reading through the (KY/TN) Static. Why did he choose to be identified with Fremont in Sandusky County, with its second town as Clyde? Why did he contact Hucka Doobie and me, [baker b., or, sometimes, Baker Bloch or Block], in the future and inquire about our knowledge of the project? He must be an agent of Jamie Maxwell Klinger Farr. Did you know that a man named Kling was an arch-nemesis of Warren G. Harding (probably Grant past-future again), and he later married his daughter, who might have kinda sorta *killed* him? Is this the true origin of the alien Klingons as arch-enemies or arch-nemeses of future time leaders Kirk, Spock, and Picard? Is it possible that perhaps most or even all Ohioan presidents were actually one president? We have the strange story that 2 of these presidents were actually grandfather and grandson, from the same small village of the state. “I’m my Own Grandpa?” anyone?

Luckily, we can directly speak to altie non-president R. “Booger” Hays in this blog to get more of lowdown on this.

By 1920, he [Warren Harding] was a contender for the Republican presidential nomination, though not a front-runner. Florence [Kling Harding; wife] gave him keen support, apparently influenced by a Washington clairvoyant ‘Madame Marcia’ Champrey, who correctly forecast that Warren would become President, but added that he would die in office.[4] The election was overshadowed further by attempted extortion by Carrie Phillips, threatening to reveal Warren’s adultery.[5] However, Florence’s newspaper experience gave her an advantage over other candidates’ wives, and she skilfully deflected press enquiries about her first marriage by implying that she had been widowed.

http://carlanthonyonline.com/2011/08/02/poisoning-the-president-today-in-flotus-history-august-2-1923/

What do you get when you google Boone+Sawyer+Doc?

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=boone+sawyer+doc&start=10

school_sign_4
where we are

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Filed under MAPS, Ohio

up with maps! 01

Baker (excerpt):

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledonia,_New_York

Communities and locations in the Town of Caledonia

Baker – A hamlet in the northeast part of the town.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledonia,_Ohio

Notable natives

Warren G. Harding was a resident of Caledonia during his childhood, and worked for a brief period of time at the community newspaper, The Argus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_G._Harding

Upon graduating, Harding had stints as a teacher and insurance man, and made a brief attempt at studying law. He then raised $300 in partnership with others to purchase the failing Marion Daily Star, the weakest of the growing city’s three newspapers. By 1886, he completely owned the Star.[14][16]

….When Harding moved to unseat the Marion Independent as the official daily paper, he met with strong resistance from local figures, such as Amos Hall Kling, one of Marion’s wealthiest real estate speculators. The editorial battle with the Independent became so heated that, at the inevitable mention of Harding’s questionable bloodline, father and son brought a shotgun and demanded a retraction at gunpoint. They were successful.[18]
Florence Harding

While Harding won the war of words and made the Marion Daily Star one of the most popular newspapers in the county, the battle took a toll on his health. In 1889, at age 24, he suffered from exhaustion and nervous fatigue. He spent several weeks at the Battle Creek Sanitarium to regain his strength and ultimately made 5 visits over 14 years.[19] Harding later returned to Marion to continue operating the paper.

…. In the last year of his Presidency, anticipating no resumption of his journalism career following his years in the White House, Harding sold the Star to Louis H. Brush and Roy D. Moore for $550,000.[25]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherwood_Anderson#Early_life

The Andersons headed north to Caledonia by way of a brief stay in a village of a few hundred called Independence (now Butler). Four[7] or five[8] years were spent in Caledonia, years which formed Anderson’s earliest memories. This period later inspired his semi-autobiographical novel Tar: A Midwest Childhood (1926).[9] In Caledonia Anderson’s father began drinking excessively, which led to financial difficulties, eventually causing the family to leave the town.[9]

7. Townsend (1987), 3
8. Rideout (2006), 18
9. Rideout (2006), 20. For connection between Tar and Caledonia, also see Anderson (1942), 14-16

The success of Dark Laughter put some extra money in Anderson’s pocket, and he used it in 1926 to purchase Ripshin, a small farm outside Marion in southwestern Virginia. Soon after, he also bought two newspapers, the Smyth County News and the Marion Democrat. As a newspaperman, Anderson immersed himself in local politics and even sometimes adopted an alter ego and pseudonym, Buck Fever, to report on colorful characters and events in town. (He collected some of his Buck Fever columns in 1929’s Hello Towns!) Anderson gave ownership of the newspapers to his son Robert in 1929….

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Anderson moved from Caledonia to Clyde in 1884.

http://www.cleveland.com/pdq/index.ssf/2012/11/90-second-know-it-all_8_us_pre.html

Taft and Harding are the last 2 (of 8) presidents born in Ohio. 2 of these 8 were assassinated (4, Garfield, and 6, McKinley). Both Taft and Harding only served 1 term. Taft was considered a “standard” president, while Harding is considered one of the worst, and could have been the first to be impeached had he not died in office. William Henry Harrison, the first Ohioan president, also died in office, the first president to do so.

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Filed under New York, Ohio, Virginia

map stuffer upper 04

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherwood_Anderson

Sherwood Anderson (September 13, 1876 – March 8, 1941) was an American novelist and short story writer, known for subjective and self-revealing works.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Howard_Taft

William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and later the tenth Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930). He is the only person to have served in both of these offices.

In surveys of presidential scholars, Taft is usually ranked near the middle of lists of all American Presidents.

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http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2013/03/20/southern-holiday-part-3/

Before I left home, the novelist Allan Gurganus had recommended that I take the audio book of Light in August on my trip. He went on to compare Blanche DuBois to that novel’s Lena Grove, pregnant and wandering around Mississippi looking for the father of her baby. “Faulkner and Williams both hailed from ‘nice’ families a few generations down on their luck,” Gurganus told me. “The drive and ambition they attribute to their very different heroines, in Light in August and in Streetcar, reflect their own strange fates. The old order has faded and a new one is taking rank. These men were geniuses, born into dream-prone minor tribes from little towns in a defeated region. So Lena’s search for a father for her child and Blanche’s wish for the security of an oil tycoon who’ll spoil her mirror their creators’ quests. Each made a knight’s gambit, each going in search of acknowledgement, recognition, a place of honor and dignity, a place to stand, in the reconfigured modern world.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_Lake,_Mississippi

Tennessee Williams visited Moon Lake Casino, and referred to it in all but two of his plays.

Yes, the three of us drove out to Moon Lake Casino, very drunk and laughing all the way.
—Blanche DuBois, A Streetcar Named Desire

Sarah Wright, who has owned the property since 1985, stated, “they loved to go to the Moon Lake Casino, because the place served Kansas City steaks and even flew in lobster from Maine, no easy task as airplane travel was then in its infancy. That was Tennessee’s introduction to this place.”[2]

William Faulkner also visited the place, and referred to it in one of his novels as “Moon Lake Hotel.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanche_DuBois

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Stella:

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Livingston (excerpt):

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Say what??

http://www.bakerblockmuseum.org/cemetery.htm

http://bakerblockmuseum.org/clouds/intheclouds/index-a.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker,_Florida

Baker is an unincorporated community in Okaloosa County, Florida. It is located about 10 miles (16 km) northwest of the county seat, Crestview, in the Florida Panhandle. The Baker Block Museum is in Baker.

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Filed under ., Alabama, Florida, MAPS, Mississippi, Tennessee