map happenings 02

cub: 1 of 1:

As a tigress whose cub had been threatened would she appear, coming out of the shadows, stealing noiselessly along and holding the long wicked scissors in her hand.

Winesap-Cub Run (Kessinger), KY. Centerpoint? Hucka D.?

To complete the pseudo-triangle: Scissors-Run, TX. “Don’t run with scissors.”

scissors01

And to remind, only other “scissors” is in same Winesap story, helping to identify the 1st three stories of the book as rock, paper, scissors (Story Room?). Rock in Kansas next to Wilmot and in Cowley County obviously is the 1st story now, as Wilmot identifies a character in the last story and Cowley identifies the writer of an important introduction to the book (introduction between last and first stories, if end is seen as looping back into beginning in an urobouros situation). Udall next to Rock and Wilmot also seems important. Identifies, for one thing, the *whole of America*, and perhaps represents the *whole of Winesap* (end to beginning) in same function. Clever huh? We know Winfield from the same county, which is the seat, is another way of saying “Winesap”. Win(n)field-Atlanta is something we haven’t brought up yet in this blog. Hope Hucka D. doesn’t stop me here.

We also know Udall is a False Winner.

GNIRPS has considerable more stuff on Cubs. Chicago Cubs specifically. Town rival (south to north) Chicago White Sox (from White Stockings) has recently been angled into our story from an unrelated direction. Chicago is our Second City. Cubs even use to be called White Stockings for a short time in the 1800s.

5 mentions of Chicago in Winesap. 2 in the 4th story concerning Doc Parcival (this would be just beyond the 3rd with the only mention of “cub”), 2 in the 8th story concerning Alice Hindman, and then the last one comes from the last story concerning Willard himself and his Departure from Winesap. Here they are in story order, then:

He came from Chicago and when he arrived was drunk and got into a fight with Albert Longworth, the baggageman.

In Chicago there was a Doctor Cronin who was murdered.

The young newspaper man did not succeed in getting a place on a Cleveland paper and went west to Chicago.

In Chicago he boarded at a house where there were several women.

His train runs from Cleveland to where it connects with a great trunk line railroad with terminals in Chicago and New York.

There’s 1 US Cronin, and in one of the 5 Anderson Counties.

cronin01

Tiny Cronin is near something called the Anderson-Faulkenberry slayings site on this map.

Anderson-County

Word Faulkner is included in Faulkenberry. W. Faulkner could be said to slay S. Anderson in an Oedipal way (son kills/usurps father). Just saying.

http://www.forttours.com/pages/andersonfaulk.asp

On January 28, 1837, six rangers, eighteen-year-old Abram Anglin, David Faulkenberry, Evan Faulkenberry, Benjamin W. Douthit, James Hunter, and Columbus Anderson, had left the fort to search for strayed hogs in the Trinity River bottom. Finding some of them, Hunter and Douthit were sent back to Fort Houston to fetch a canoe.

In their absence, the other four were attacked by a band of Indians on the Trinity River at a point known as Bonner’s Ferry. Anderson was mortally wounded, although he managed to swim the river and crawl two miles before dying. David Faulkenberry, severely wounded, also swam the river and crawled about two- hundred yards away before succumbing to his wounds. The Indians later claimed that David’s son, Evan Faulkenberry, fought like a wild man, killing two Indians and wounding a third. Severely wounded and already scalped, he was said to have jerked from his captives’ grasp and swum halfway across the Trinity before dying. The fourth man, Abram Anglin, although hit by a bullet in the thigh, managed to swim the river and escape on horseback with James Hunter, one of the two men who had returned from Fort Houston in time to witness the Indian attack.

The 3 that died were Columbus Anderson, David Faulkenberry, and his son Evan Faulkenberry. All swam the river or attempted to, leaving Anderson County and entering the next county west in doing so or attempting to do so. Anderson swam the river and died 2 miles beyond. Faulkenberry the father swam the river and died 200 yards beyond. Faulkenberry the son swam about halfway into the river and died before making it to the opposite shore. The 4th man involved (Abram Anglin) swam the river and managed to escape.

Btw, Anderson County is not named for Columbus but for a guy named Kenneth Anderson, former v.p. of the Republic of Texas, a service then in the future for the Anderson-Faulkenberry victims.

What if this is more than it appears on the surface, somehow tied to the future Anderson-Faulkner relationship? Anglin — angling? (fishing?).

Speaking of which, let’s return to Winesap and “fish” again. Only 2 “fisher”s, but 5 “fish”. 1 of these fish stands alone (“fish”), and is in the same sentence as 1 of the 2 Winesap fishers or fishermen, let’s say. That one was caught but then let go back into the stream or brook from which it came. 2 of the “fish” are part of “fisher”s (obviously). The remaining 2 “fish” (that got away or weren’t caught?) are in the last story again, which also contains the last of 5 “Chicago”s. I’ve cited them before but here they are once more. They both make part of the word “fishing”.

In the fall and spring he spends his Sundays fishing in Lake Erie.

In the smoking car there was a man who had just invited Tom to go on a fishing trip to Sandusky Bay.

Recreational escape (different type of Departure) to Lake Erie in the direction of Sandusky Bay may be implied. Where could this take us?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_Island_%28Ohio%29

Lake_Erie_Islands_Map

What could we be fishing for, ultimately?

And guess what? One of only 2 Longworth pplaces is in Fisher County, Texas (other is in remote area of Minnesota). That’s the other proper name mentioned in Winesap sentences containing Chicago. And that’s the only US Fisher County. Peculiar still?

(to be continued)

FisherCountyTexas1920

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Filed under Kansas, Kentucky, MAPS, Ohio, Texas

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